Shipping

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Why it's important to use enough tape.
Why shipping film on cores isn't a great idea.

Preparing and packing film for shipment is a crucial part of proper film handling.

Express Vs. Ground - The most commonly used courier for motion picture film is FedEx Express. Nearly every archive ships this way and insists on FedEx 3-day at minimum. Insurance is almost always required, either through FedEx or through your own insurance company (which is usually astronomically cheaper!). Many archives and distributors will not allow prints to be shipped via FedEx Ground. If you're not sure what the shipping requirements for the print you're sending are, it is always best to ask the owner of the print.

Labels - If you're shipping a print in Goldberg cans, seal your shipping label inside a Fedex pouch and stick it to the side or front of the can, or attach it to a FedEx tie on tag and attach that to the handle of the can. Under no circumstances should a two can print be shipped with only one label.

Tracking - Whether you are the exhibitor or owner of a print, it is a common courtesy to forward tracking information to the recipient of a print once it is sent. It is also a great idea to write the tracking number on a piece of paper tape and affix it to the can (or if shipping in a box just write it on the box). This way, if a label falls off or is destroyed, the tracking number can be used by Fedex to determine the package's destination, and it may even make it there on time.

Taping and reel bands - Always tape town the ends of reels with at least six inches of FRESH paper tape/artists tape (not masking tape or any other type of tape which will leave a residue on the film after a few weeks). Reel bands eliminate the need for tape, but take extra care to make sure they are secure.

  • Common problems
  • Packing materials
  • Containers
  • Zip ties etc
  • Shipping reels
  • Don't ship on cores (pro + con)

External links